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The 5 Daily Habits Rachel Hollis Swears By

Rachel Hollis Five to Thrive

PHOTO COURTESY OF RACHEL HOLLIS

1. Hydrate.

Hollis advises drinking half of your body weight in ounces of water every day to flush toxins from your body and ensure you don’t mistake thirst for hunger.

2. Wake up earlier.

Hollis swears by the idea that giving yourself an extra hour before anyone else—kids, spouse, etc.—is awake allows you to focus solely on yourself and your goals. This can be spent journaling, working out or simply as quiet alone time.

3. Give up one category of food for 30 days.

We fail to achieve our goals because we try to take on too much at the same time. Nutritional goals are no different. Instead of cutting out every single type of bad food, try just eliminating fast food or ice cream for 30 days. Once you tackle one type of junk food, move on to the next. Hitting each monthly milestone will serve as motivation for the next one.

4. Move your body every day.

Even walking for 20 minutes every day can boost your metabolism and promote the release of positive brain chemicals such as serotonin and dopamine.

5. Practice active gratitude.

Hollis advises writing 10 things you’re grateful for every day, such as “I’m grateful that my dog let me sleep through the night” or “I’m grateful that this coffee is doing its job.”

Related: Rachel Hollis: ‘You’re Allowed to Want More for Yourself’

 

This article originally appeared in the Summer 2019 issue of SUCCESS magazine.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE HOLLIS CO.

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Cecilia Meis is a full-time writer and editor based in Dallas, Texas. Besides SUCCESS, her work has appeared in Time Out Dallas, Rewire, Healthline and others. Outside of work, she plays beach volleyball, attempts home cooking and is ardently working toward making her cat, Nola, Insta-famous.

4 Comments

  1. Russell Baker on March 19, 2019 at 7:47 pm

    \”drinking half of your body weight in ounces of water every day to flush toxins from your body\”. That\’s not how your kidneys work, they have a complex filtration system (if you will), not based on the amount of water you drink. Journaling your gratitude at the end of the day can have a profound effect on your outlook towards life for a small amount of time expended, although I doubt many people will note down 10 things – start with 3

    • Keri on September 9, 2019 at 10:20 am

      I write down 10 in under 30 seconds. If you can’t think of more than 3 it’s an opportunity for growth in your mindset. The more gratitude you practice, the more abundance of joy you will feel and create.

  2. Russell Baker on March 19, 2019 at 7:57 pm

    \”ensure you don’t mistake thirst for hunger\” – what does that even mean? Do people mistake thirst for hunger? How do you know you were just thirsty when it felt like hunger. Are you suggesting a glass of water 30 mins prior to eating anything, just in case it was really thirst? Why post this vague nonsense?

    • Deb on October 30, 2019 at 9:17 am

      “Mild dehydration is often masked as feelings of hunger, when really your body just needs fluids,” says Alissa Rumsey, RD, spokesperson for the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The confusion happens in the hypothalamus, the part of the brain that regulates both appetite and thirst.

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