5 Ways to Spur Creativity

How to balance creativity and work
December 28, 2017

MelisseGelulaAs entrepreneurs, we’re all trying to solve something. I love focusing on this question: What will serve the reader that she’s not getting? It creates white space like nothing else. Staying personally connected to the people, businesses and movements driving your industry forward is vital. You have to leave your laptop and talk to people, work out with them and have regular knowledge-sharing dates.

—Melisse Gelula,co-founder, chief content officer, Well + Good

Related: A 4-Question Guide to Unlock Your Creativity

AliMirzaWhen I get stuck and need a creative outlet, I have to do something physical. Playing basketball, working out or going for a walk really clears my mind, and I am able to get perspective.

—Ali Mirza, president, Rose Garden Consulting

KevinGrey.pngWhen I’m trying to spur creativity, I’m not looking for long, drawn-out conversations; I just need a spark to get going or to get some new momentum. For me, creativity is like catching lightning in a bottle. When I sense the small signs of creativity, I run with it like a storm chaser. Regardless of the time of day or the meeting, I write notes, dictate thoughts, and look for distant flashes of light.

—Kevin Gilliland, clinical psychologist, author of Struggle Well Live Well, executive director of Innovation36

DaliaMacpheeAs a fashion designer, I'm always looking for inspiration. I find doing anything outside of the box usually does the trick. This may be traveling somewhere new, eating a food for the first time or being exposed to revolutionary ideas. Anything that breaks the norm.

—Dalia MacPhee, CEO, Dalia MacPhee

ChrisVanDusenThe best way to spur creativity is to get mentally prepared. For me, being physically active every morning sets a great tempo for the day. I am sharper, clearer, and more focused on thinking creatively and strategically.

—Chris Van Dusen, CEO, Parcon Media

Related: 6 Scientifically Proven Creativity Boosters You’ve Probably Never Heard Of


This article originally appeared in the January 2018 issue of SUCCESS magazine.

You might like

How to Envision—and Reach—Your Big Potential

How to Envision—and Reach—Your Big Potential

Your goals should be moving targets, not destinations. Shawn Achor explains why in an excerpt from his new book ‘Big Potential.’

February 20, 2018